Resource Center

Credit Freezes Are Now Free (Legal)

Dec 19, 2018 in Resource Center | Comments Off on Credit Freezes Are Now Free (Legal)

Consumers in most states were required to pay to put a freeze on their credit file, but as of September 21, 2018 it is now free. This article will explain what a credit freeze does, why consumers might choose a freeze and how to put freezes in place at the three major credit bureaus.

Link: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2018/10/new-credit-law-faqs

Link: https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/09/credit-freezes-are-free-let-the-ice-age-begin/

Link: https://www.experian.com/blogs/ask-experian/how-to-freeze-your-credit-report-for-free/

From the Internet of Things to the Internet of Bodies (Privacy)

Dec 19, 2018 in Resource Center | Comments Off on From the Internet of Things to the Internet of Bodies (Privacy)

“The line between human and machine is blurring — and creating new concerns about consumer safety and privacy rights,” says Mary Lee, a mathematician for the RAND Corporation. The Internet of Things (IoT) has seen us connecting everything from cars to toasters to light switches to the Internet. New medical devices connect our bodies to the Internet as well—creating the “Internet of Bodies.” Implanted devices not only monitor the functioning of a body, they have the potential to control it. Having your phone hacked could be annoying and expensive. Having your pacemaker hacked could be fatal. This article will explore the current state of the Internet of Bodies and what the future may hold.

Link: https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/gvyqgm/the-internet-of-bodies-is-coming-and-you-could-get-hacked
Link: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/theworldpost/wp/2018/10/15/health-data/
Link: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/oct/19/dick-cheney-heart-assassination-fear

Agent Tesla Malware (Crimeware)

Dec 19, 2018 in Resource Center | Comments Off on Agent Tesla Malware (Crimeware)

Keyloggers are nothing new, but Agent Tesla takes the capabilities of simple keyloggers to new levels. Among other capabilities, Agent Tesla can steal passwords from all major browsers, and capture snapshots of the victim’s keystrokes, their desktop, and pictures from their webcam at timed intervals. Although Agent Tesla has been around for a few years, there has recently been an increase in its popularity with more than 6,300 customers paying subscription fees to license the malware. This article will look at what Agent Tesla does and how it is spread.

Link: https://krebsonsecurity.com/2018/10/who-is-agent-tesla/
Link: https://www.digitrustgroup.com/agent-tesla-keylogger/
Link: https://www.securityweek.com/new-agent-tesla-spyware-variant-discovered
Link: https://www.zdnet.com/article/hackers-tamper-with-exploit-chain-to-drop-agent-tesla-circumvent-antivirus-solutions/

Soon, the Majority of Mobile Calls Will Be Fraudulent (Scams)

Dec 19, 2018 in Resource Center | Comments Off on Soon, the Majority of Mobile Calls Will Be Fraudulent (Scams)

After analyzing more than 50 billion calls made to mobile customers over 18 months, technology company First Orion predicts that nearly half of all calls to mobile phones will be fraudulent in 2019 unless the industry adopts and implements more effective call protection solutions. Over the past year, First Orion’s data shows a drastic increase in mobile scam calls—from 3.7% of total calls in 2017 to 29.2% in 2018—and that number is projected to reach 44.6% by early 2019. This article will look at reasons for the surge in fraudulent calls, and suggest steps consumers can take to reduce the number of scam calls they receive.

Link: https://firstorion.com/nearly-50-of-u-s-mobile-traffic-will-be-scam-calls-by-2019/
Link: https://www.aarp.org/money/scams-fraud/info-2018/scammer-calls-increasing.html
Link: https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/12/you-think-its-your-friend-calling-but-its-actually-this-growing-phone-scam.html
Link: https://www.sans.org/sites/default/files/2018-07/201807-OUCH-July-English_0.pdf

How Scammers Gain Your Trust (Scams)

Dec 19, 2018 in Resource Center | Comments Off on How Scammers Gain Your Trust (Scams)

One reason scammers are so effective is that they are skilled at getting their victims to trust them and fall for their scams. However, consumers who know the signs of a scam are better prepared to resist. This article will discuss some of the common tricks employed by scammers and how consumers can protect themselves.

Link: https://www.rd.com/advice/relationships/con-artists-win-trust/
Link: http://home.bt.com/tech-gadgets/computing/security/six-tricks-fraudsters-use-to-gain-your-trust-11364184899041
Link: https://www.ajc.com/marketing/things-scammers-tell-you/f1bIl7nvZa0pa14K07VmeN/
Link: https://www.mirror.co.uk/money/six-clever-tricks-fraudsters-use-10530375

Biometric Privacy (Privacy)

Dec 19, 2018 in Resource Center | Comments Off on Biometric Privacy (Privacy)

Imagine not having to remember log in IDs and passwords, and using a fingerprint or retinal scan for all of your log ins. It is called biometrics, and it is already happening. For example, the newest iOS and Android phones use facial recognition to unlock the phones and authorize transactions. Although this new technology is convenient, it comes at a price. For biometrics to work there has to be a database of biometric scans to match against. That leads to questions about the security of stored biometric data. This article will look at the present and future of biometrics and the legal and privacy issues involved.

Link: https://www.eff.org/issues/biometrics
Link: https://computer.howstuffworks.com/biometrics-privacy.htm
Link: https://privacypolicies.com/blog/privacy-policy-biometrics-laws/
Link: https://www.epic.org/privacy/biometrics/
Link: https://techcrunch.com/2017/09/13/iphone-xs-face-id-raises-security-and-privacy-questions/

Quarterly Newsletter:

Dec 19, 2018 in Resource Center | Comments Off on Quarterly Newsletter:

Get Rid of Unused Apps (Privacy)

The typical smart phone user has many more apps on their phone than they actually use. They download the hot new app, use it for a while, and then forget about it, leaving it to take up space on the phone. But filling your phone with unused apps poses more serious dangers than simply maxing out your phone’s storage. It can leave you open to cyberattacks, phishing, and scams. This article will discuss the dangers of keeping old, unused apps on your phone, and the best ways to clean up Android and iOS phones.         

Link: https://www.kaspersky.com/blog/my-precious-data-report-one/14093/
Link: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2017/12/get-rid-unwanted-apps
Link: https://www.androidpit.com/android-apps-you-should-remove-immediately
Link: https://www.popsci.com/delete-your-apps
Link: https://www.postplanner.com/how-to-remove-facebook-apps-from-profile/

Podcast: Security Resolutions to Keep Your Identity Safe

Dec 19, 2018 in Resource Center | Comments Off on Podcast: Security Resolutions to Keep Your Identity Safe

The New Year is a perfect time for making resolutions. So while you are resolving to work out more often, eat healthier and get out of debt, take a few minutes to make and implement these simple resolutions that will help protect you from hacking and identity theft.

Five Identity Theft Terms You Need to Know

Dec 19, 2018 in Resource Center | Comments Off on Five Identity Theft Terms You Need to Know

Credit Freeze
Credit Report
Medical Identity Theft
Phishing
Synthetic Identity Theft

Do We Over-Monitor Our Kids, Just Because We Can?

Jul 27, 2017 in Resource Center | Comments Off on Do We Over-Monitor Our Kids, Just Because We Can?

“We are tracking our children’s every move, and they can feel it.”

“We are tracking our children’s every move, and they can feel it,” says lawyer and educator Elizabeth Small in the Washington Post. Small’s concern is that children do not have a space that is private, where every moment of their lives is not monitored and shared by parents, teachers and others.

Children are being observed and photographed at school, their computer activity is monitored by parents at home, and their cell phones are tracked by parents who want to know where their children are and what they are doing every minute of the day. An article in the New York Times says, “One danger of these technologies, of course, is that many parents will be tempted to overuse them, and in intrusive ways. A parent who constantly micromanages a teenager’s life — Why did you stop here? Why did you go there? — risks stifling the independence needed to develop into an adult.”

Small recounts a conversation with her daughter after the daughter was called to her school office. She was afraid that she was in trouble for something. Small asked if her teacher had spoken to her about anything, and her daughter said no, but she worried that cameras in the hallway had caught her whispering to a friend in line. Cameras? “Yes mama, there are cameras everywhere.”

While Small loves having the information about her children that she receives through their teachers’ online journals, videos and social media posts, she wonders if it is healthy to have so much real-time access to her children’s lives. “I also remember what it was like to be a student. I loved school mostly because it was a place I could be invisible from my strict family. School gave me the freedom to experiment with my identity,” says Small.

Some experts are concerned that children have little or no say over how much of their lives are monitored and shared. Danah Boyd, the founder of Data & Society and a visiting professor at New York University, said that sharing digital information can be a sign of trust and respect between people with close relationships, but that it can become an abuse of power in unequal relationships.

She said that when she was working with teenagers she was disturbed to find that the privacy norms established by parents influenced the children’s relationships with their peers, such as sharing their passwords for social media and other accounts with boyfriends and girlfriends. “They learned this from watching us and from the language we used when we explained why we demanded to have their passwords,” said Boyd. “And this is all fine, albeit weird, in a healthy relationship. But devastating in an unhealthy one.”

Parents want to protect their children and be involved in their daily lives; however, Small recommends that parents be “deliberate about giving them spaces where we don’t, even by accident, seek a window into their world, or a way to monitor their lives. Parents need to make sure they are giving their kids age-appropriate levels of privacy, and letting them know what information they are accessing.”